Toyota Tacoma manuals

Opel Insignia B 2018-2022 Owners Manual: Child Restraints

Older Children

Older children who have outgrown

Older children who have outgrown booster seats should wear the vehicle's seat belts.

The manufacturer instructions that come with the booster seat state the weight and height limitations for that booster. Use a booster seat with a lap-shoulder belt until the child passes the fit test below:

Q: What is the proper way to wear seat belts?

A: An older child should wear a lap-shoulder belt and get the additional restraint a shoulder belt can provide. The shoulder belt should not cross the face or neck. The lap belt should fit snugly below the hips, just touching the top of the thighs.

This applies belt force to the child's pelvic bones in a crash.

It should never be worn over the abdomen, which could cause severe or even fatal internal injuries in a crash.

Also see "Rear Seat Belt Comfort Guides" under Lap-Shoulder Belt.

According to accident statistics, children are safer when properly restrained in a rear seating position.

In a crash, children who are not buckled up can strike other people who are buckled up, or can be thrown out of the vehicle. Older children need to use seat belts properly.

Warning: Never allow more than one child to wear the same seat belt. The seat belt cannot properly spread the impact forces. In a crash, they can be crushed together and seriously injured. A seat belt must be used by only one person at a time.

Warning:

Warning: Never allow a child to wear the seat belt with the shoulder belt behind their back. A child can be seriously injured by not wearing the lap-shoulder belt properly. In a crash, the child would not be restrained by the shoulder belt.

The child could move too far forward increasing the chance of head and neck injury. The child might also slide under the lap belt. The belt force would then be applied right on the abdomen.

That could cause serious or fatal injuries. The shoulder belt should go over the shoulder and across the chest.

Infants and Young Children

Infants and Young Children

Everyone in a vehicle needs protection! This includes infants and all other children. Neither the distance traveled nor the age and size of the traveler changes the need, for everyone, to use safety restraints. In fact, the law in every state in the United States and in every Canadian province says children up to some age must be restrained while in a vehicle.

Warning: Children can be seriously injured or strangled if a shoulder belt is wrapped around their neck. The shoulder belt can tighten but cannot be loosened if it is locked.

The shoulder belt locks when it is pulled all the way out of the retractor. It unlocks when the shoulder belt is allowed to go all the way back into the retractor, but it cannot do this if it is wrapped around a child's neck.

If the shoulder belt is locked and tightened around a child's neck, the only way to loosen the belt is to cut it.

Never leave children unattended in a vehicle and never allow children to play with the seat belts.

Every time infants and young children ride in vehicles, they should have the protection provided by appropriate child restraints. Neither the vehicle's seat belt system nor its airbag system is designed for them.

Children who are not restrained properly can strike other people, or can be thrown out of the vehicle.

Warning: Never hold an infant or a child while riding in a vehicle. Due to crash forces, an infant or a child will become so heavy it is not possible to hold it during a crash.

For example, in a crash at only 40 km/h (25 mph), a 5.5 kg (12 lb) infant will suddenly become a 110 kg (240 lb) force on a person's arms. An infant or child should be secured in an appropriate restraint.

Warning:

Warning: Children who are up against, or very close to, any airbag when it inflates can be seriously injured or killed. Never put a rear-facing child restraint in the front outboard seat. Secure a rear-facing child restraint in a rear seat. It is also better to secure a forward-facing child restraint in a rear seat. If you must secure a forward-facing child restraint in the front outboard seat, always move the front passenger seat as far back as it will go.

Child restraints are devices used to

Child restraints are devices used to restrain, seat, or position children in the vehicle and are sometimes called child seats or car seats.

There are three basic types of child restraints:

The proper child restraint for your child depends on their size, weight, and age, and also on whether the child restraint is compatible with the vehicle in which it will be used.

For each type of child restraint, there are many different models available. When purchasing a child restraint, be sure it is designed to be used in a motor vehicle. If it is, the restraint will have a label saying that it meets federal motor vehicle safety standards. The restraint manufacturer's instructions that come with the restraint state the weight and height limitations for a particular child restraint. In addition, there are many kinds of restraints available for children with special needs.

Warning: To reduce the risk of neck and head injury in a crash, infants and toddlers should be secured in a rear-facing child restraint until age two, or until they reach the maximum height and weight limits of their child restraint.

Warning: A young child's hip bones are still so small that the vehicle's regular seat belt may not remain low on the hip bones, as it should.

Instead, it may settle up around the child's abdomen. In a crash, the belt would apply force on a body area that is unprotected by any bony structure. This alone could cause serious or fatal injuries. To reduce the risk of serious or fatal injuries during a crash, young children should always be secured in appropriate child restraints.

Child Restraint Systems

Rear-Facing Infant Restraint Rear-Facing Infant Restraint

A rear-facing child restraint provides restraint with the seating surface against the back of the infant.

The harness system holds the infant in place and, in a crash, acts to keep the infant positioned in the restraint.

Forward-Facing Child Restraint Forward-Facing Child Restraint

A forward-facing child restraint provides restraint for the child's body with the harness.

Booster Seats Booster Seats

A belt-positioning booster seat is used for children who have outgrown their forward-facing child restraint. Boosters are designed to improve the fit of the vehicle's seat belt system until the child is large enough for the vehicle seat belts to fit properly without a booster seat.

Securing an Add-On Child Restraint in the Vehicle

Warning: A child can be seriously injured or killed in a crash if the child restraint is not properly secured in the vehicle. Secure the child restraint properly in the vehicle using the vehicle's seat belt or LATCH system, following the instructions that came with that child restraint and the instructions in this manual.

To help reduce the chance of injury, the child restraint must be secured in the vehicle. Child restraints must be secured in vehicle seats by lap belts or the lap belt portion of a lap-shoulder belt, or by the LATCH system.

Children can be endangered in a crash if the child restraint is not properly secured in the vehicle.

When securing an add-on child restraint, refer to the instructions that come with the restraint which may be on the restraint itself or in a booklet, or both, and to this manual.

The child restraint instructions are important, so if they are not available, obtain a replacement copy from the manufacturer.

Keep in mind that an unsecured child restraint can move around in a collision or sudden stop and injure people in the vehicle. Be sure to properly secure any child restraint in the vehicle- even when no child is in it.

In some areas of the United States and Canada, Certified Child Passenger Safety Technicians (CPSTs) are available to inspect and demonstrate how to correctly use and install child restraints. In the U.S., refer to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) website to locate the nearest child safety seat inspection station. For CPST availability in Canada, check with Transport Canada or the Provincial Ministry of Transportation office.

Securing the Child Within the Child Restraint

Warning: A child can be seriously injured or killed in a crash if the child is not properly secured in the child restraint. Secure the child properly following the instructions that came with that child restraint.

Where to Put the Restraint

According to accident statistics, children and infants are safer when properly restrained in an appropriate child restraint secured in a rear seating position.

Whenever possible, children aged 12 and under should be secured in a rear seating position.

Never put a rear-facing child restraint in the front. This is because the risk to the rear-facing child is so great if the airbag deploys.

Warning: A child in a rear-facing child restraint can be seriously injured or killed if the front passenger airbag inflates. This is because the back of the rear-facing child restraint would be very close to the inflating airbag. A child in a forward-facing child restraint can be seriously injured or killed if the front passenger airbag inflates and the passenger seat is in a forward position.

Even if the passenger sensing system has turned off the front passenger frontal airbag, no system is fail-safe. No one can guarantee that an airbag will not deploy under some unusual circumstance, even though it is turned off.

Secure rear-facing child restraints in a rear seat, even if the airbag is off. If you secure a forward-facing child restraint in the front seat, always move the front passenger seat as far back as it will go. It is better to secure the child restraint in a rear seat.

When securing a child restraint with the seat belts in a rear seat position, study the instructions that came with the child restraint to make sure it is compatible with this vehicle.

Child restraints and booster seats vary considerably in size, and some may fit in certain seating positions better than others.

Depending on where you place the child restraint and the size of the child restraint, you may not be able to access adjacent seat belts or LATCH anchors for additional passengers or child restraints.

Adjacent seating positions should not be used if the child restraint prevents access to or interferes with the routing of the seat belt.

Wherever a child restraint is installed, be sure to follow the instructions that came with the child restraint system and secure the child restraint system properly.

Keep in mind that an unsecured child restraint can move around in a collision or sudden stop and injure people in the vehicle. Be sure to properly secure any child restraint in the vehicle - even when no child is in it.

Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children (LATCH System)

The LATCH system secures a child restraint during driving or in a crash.

LATCH attachments on the child restraint are used to attach the child restraint to the anchors in the vehicle. The LATCH system is designed to make installation of a child restraint easier.

In order to use the LATCH system in your vehicle, you need a child restraint that has LATCH attachments. LATCH-compatible rear-facing and forward-facing child seats can be properly installed using either the LATCH anchors or the vehicle's seat belts. Do not use both the seat belts and the LATCH anchorage system to secure a rear-facing or forward-facing child seat.

Booster seats use the vehicle's seat belts to secure the child and the booster seat. If the manufacturer recommends that the booster seat be secured with the LATCH system, this can be done as long as the booster seat can be positioned properly and there is no interference with the proper positioning of the lap-shoulder belt on the child.

Make sure to follow the instructions that came with the child restraint, and also the instructions in this manual.

When installing a child restraint with a top tether, you must also use either the lower anchors or the seat belts to properly secure the child restraint. A child restraint must never be installed using only the top tether and anchor.

The LATCH anchorage system can be used until the combined weight of the child plus the child restraint is 29.5 kg (65 lbs). Use the seat belt alone instead of the LATCH anchorage system once the combined weight is more than 29.5 kg (65 lbs).

Child restraints built after March 2014 will be labeled with the specific child weight up to which the LATCH system can be used to install the restraint.

The following explains how to attach a child restraint with these attachments in the vehicle.

Not all vehicle seating positions have lower anchors. In this case, the seat belt must be used (with top tether where available) to secure the child restraint.

Lower Anchors

Lower anchors (1) are metal bars

Lower anchors (1) are metal bars built into the vehicle. There are two lower anchors for each LATCH seating position that will accommodate a child restraint with lower attachments (2).

Top Tether Anchor

A top tether (3, 4) is used to secure

A top tether (3, 4) is used to secure the top of the child restraint to the vehicle. A top tether anchor is built into the vehicle. The top tether attachment hook (2) on the child restraint connects to the top tether anchor in the vehicle in order to reduce the forward movement and rotation of the child restraint during driving or in a crash.

The child restraint may have a single tether (3) or a dual tether (4).

Either will have a single attachment hook (2) to secure the top tether to the anchor.

Some child restraints that have a top tether are designed for use with or without the top tether being attached. Others require the top tether always to be attached. In Canada, the law requires that forward-facing child restraints have a top tether, and that the tether be attached. Be sure to read and follow the instructions for your child restraint.

Lower Anchor and Top Tether Anchor Locations

: Seating positions with

top tether anchors. : Seating positions with top tether anchors.

anchors.: Seating positions with two lower anchors.

To assist in locating the lower

To assist in locating the lower anchors, each seating position with lower anchors has two labels, on the seatback near the crease between the seatback and the seat cushion.

The lower anchors are located

The lower anchors are located under the labeled covers on the seatback near the crease between the seatback and the seat cushion.

To assist in locating the top tether

To assist in locating the top tether anchors, the top tether anchor symbol is near the anchors.

The top tether anchors are on the

The top tether anchors are on the back of the rear seatbacks. Remove the cargo cover before installing the top tether. The cargo cover should remain off while the top tether is in use. Be sure to use an anchor on the same side of the vehicle as the seating position where the child restraint will be placed.

Do not secure a child restraint in a position without a top tether anchor if a national or local law requires that the top tether be attached, or if the instructions that come with the child restraint say that the top tether must be attached.

According to accident statistics, children and infants are safer when properly restrained in a child restraint system or infant restraint system secured in a rear seating position.

Securing a Child Restraint Designed for the LATCH System

Warning: A child could be seriously injured or killed in a crash if the child restraint is not properly attached to the vehicle using either the LATCH anchors or the vehicle seat belt. Follow the instructions that came with the child restraint and the instructions in this manual.

Warning: To reduce the risk of serious or fatal injuries during a crash, do not attach more than one child restraint to a single anchor.

Attaching more than one child restraint to a single anchor could cause the anchor or attachment to come loose or even break during a crash. A child or others could be injured.

Warning: Children can be seriously injured or strangled if a shoulder belt is wrapped around their neck. The shoulder belt can tighten but cannot be loosened if it is locked.

The shoulder belt locks when it is pulled all the way out of the retractor. It unlocks when the shoulder belt is allowed to go all the way back into the retractor, but it cannot do this if it is wrapped around a child's neck.

If the shoulder belt is locked and tightened around a child's neck, the only way to loosen the belt is to cut it.

Buckle any unused seat belts behind the child restraint so children cannot reach them. Pull the shoulder belt all the way out of the retractor to set the lock, and tighten the belt behind the child restraint after the child restraint has been installed.

Caution: Do not let the LATCH attachments rub against the vehicle's seat belts. This may damage these parts. If necessary, move buckled seat belts to avoid rubbing the LATCH attachments.

Do not fold the rear seatback when the seat is occupied. Do not fold the empty rear seat with a seat belt buckled. This could damage the seat belt or the seat.

Unbuckle and return the seat belt to its stowed position, before folding the seat.

If you need to secure more than one child restraint in the rear seat, see Where to Put the Restraint.

1. Attach and tighten the lower attachments to the lower anchors. If the child restraint does not have lower attachments or the desired seating position does not have lower anchors, secure the child restraint with the top tether and the seat belts. Refer to the child restraint manufacturer instructions and the instructions in this manual.

1.1. Find the lower anchors for the desired seating position.

1.2. Put the child restraint on the seat.

1.3. Attach and tighten the lower attachments on the child restraint to the lower anchors.

2. If the child restraint manufacturer recommends that the top tether be attached, attach and tighten the top tether to the top tether anchor, if equipped. Refer to the child restraint instructions and the following steps:

2.1. Find the top tether anchor.

2.2. Remove the cargo cover before installing the top tether. The cargo cover should remain off while the top tether is in use.

2.3. Route and tighten the top tether according to your child restraint instructions and the following instructions:

If the position you are using does not have a headrest or head restraint and you are using a single tether, route the tether over the seatback.

If the position you are using does not have a headrest or head restraint and you are using a dual tether, route the tether over the seatback.

If the position you are using has an adjustable headrest or head restraint and you are using a single tether, raise the headrest or head restraint and route the tether under the headrest or head restraint and in between the headrest or head restraint posts.

If the position you are using has an adjustable headrest or head restraint and you are using a dual tether, raise the headrest or head restraint and route the tether under the headrest or head restraint and around the headrest or head restraint posts.

3. Before placing a child in the child restraint, make sure it is securely held in place. To check, grasp the child restraint at the LATCH path and attempt to move it side to side and back and forth. There should be no more than 2.5 cm (1 in) of movement for proper installation.

Replacing LATCH System Parts After a Crash

Warning: A crash can damage the LATCH system in the vehicle. A damaged LATCH system may not properly secure the child restraint, resulting in serious injury or even death in a crash. To help make sure the LATCH system is working properly after a crash, see your dealer to have the system inspected and any necessary replacements made as soon as possible.

If the vehicle has the LATCH system and it was being used during a crash, new LATCH system parts may be needed.

New parts and repairs may be necessary even if the LATCH system was not being used at the time of the crash.

Securing Child Restraints (With the Seat Belt in the Rear Seat)

When securing a child restraint in a rear seating position, study the instructions that came with the child restraint to make sure it is compatible with this vehicle.

If the child restraint has the LATCH system, see Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children (LATCH System) for how and where to install the child restraint using LATCH. If a child restraint is secured in the vehicle using a seat belt and it uses a top tether, see Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children (LATCH System) for top tether anchor locations.

Do not secure a child seat in a position without a top tether anchor if a national or local law requires that the top tether be anchored, or if the instructions that come with the child restraint say that the top strap must be anchored.

If the child restraint or vehicle seat position does not have the LATCH system, you will be using the seat belt to secure the child restraint. Be sure to follow the instructions that came with the child restraint.

If more than one child restraint needs to be installed in the rear seat, be sure to read Where to Put the Restraint.

1. Put the child restraint on the seat.

2. Pick up the latch plate, and run the lap and shoulder portions of the vehicle's seat belt through or around the restraint.

The child restraint instructions will show you how.

3. Push the latch plate into the

3. Push the latch plate into the buckle until it clicks. If the latch plate will not go fully into the buckle, check if the correct buckle is being used.

Position the release button on the buckle, away from the child restraint system, so that the seat belt could be quickly unbuckled if necessary.

4. Pull the shoulder belt all the

4. Pull the shoulder belt all the way out of the retractor to set the lock. When the retractor lock is set, the belt can be tightened but not pulled out of the retractor.

5. To tighten the belt, push down

5. To tighten the belt, push down on the child restraint, pull the shoulder portion of the belt to tighten the lap portion of the belt, and feed the shoulder belt back into the retractor. When installing a forward-facing child restraint, it may be helpful to use your knee to push down on the child restraint as you tighten the belt.

Try to pull the belt out of the retractor to make sure the retractor is locked. If the retractor is not locked, repeat Steps 4 and 5.

6. If the child restraint has a top tether, follow the child restraint manufacturer's instructions regarding the use of the top tether.

7. Before placing a child in the child restraint, make sure it is securely held in place. To check, grasp the child restraint at the seat belt path and attempt to move it side to side and back and forth. When the child restraint is properly installed, there should be no more than 2.5 cm (1 in) of movement.

To remove the child restraint, unbuckle the vehicle seat belt and let it return to the stowed position.

If the top tether is attached to a top tether anchor, disconnect it.

Securing Child Restraints (With the Seat Belt in the Front Seat)

This vehicle has airbags. A rear seat is a safer place to secure a forward-facing child restraint. See Where to Put the Restraint.

In addition, the vehicle has a passenger sensing system which is designed to turn off the front outboard passenger frontal airbag and knee airbag under certain conditions.

See Passenger Sensing System and Passenger Airbag Status Indicator for more information, including important safety information.

Never put a rear-facing child seat in the front. This is because the risk to the rear-facing child is so great if the airbag deploys.

Warning: A child in a rear-facing child restraint can be seriously injured or killed if the front outboard passenger frontal airbag inflates.

This is because the back of the rear-facing child restraint would be very close to the inflating airbag. A child in a forward-facing child restraint can be seriously injured or killed if the front outboard passenger frontal airbag inflates and the passenger seat is in a forward position.

Even if the passenger sensing system has turned off the front outboard passenger airbag(s), no system is fail-safe. No one can guarantee that an airbag will not deploy under some unusual circumstance, even though the airbag(s) are off.

Secure rear-facing child restraints in a rear seat, even if the airbag(s) are off. If you secure a forward-facing child restraint in the front outboard passenger seat, always move the seat as far back as it will go. It is better to secure the child restraint in a rear seat.

If the child restraint uses a top tether, see Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children (LATCH System) for top tether anchor locations.

Do not secure a child seat in a position without a top tether anchor if a national or local law requires that the top tether be anchored, or if the instructions that come with the child restraint say that the top strap must be anchored.

In Canada, the law requires that forward-facing child restraints have a top tether, and that the tether be attached.

When using the lap-shoulder belt to secure the child restraint in this position, follow the instructions that came with the child restraint and the following instructions:

1. Move the seat as far back as it will go before securing the forward-facing child restraint.

Move the seat upward or the seatback to an upright position, if needed, to get a tight installation of the child restraint.

When the passenger sensing system has turned off the front outboard passenger frontal airbag and knee airbag, the off indicator on the passenger airbag status indicator should light and stay lit when you start the vehicle.

2. Put the child restraint on the seat.

3. Pick up the latch plate, and run the lap and shoulder portions of the vehicle's seat belt through or around the restraint.

The child restraint instructions will show you how.

4. Push the latch plate into the

4. Push the latch plate into the buckle until it clicks.

Position the release button on the buckle, away from the child restraint system, so that the seat belt could be quickly unbuckled if necessary.

5. Pull the shoulder belt all the

5. Pull the shoulder belt all the way out of the retractor to set the lock. When the retractor lock is set, the belt can be tightened but not pulled out of the retractor.

6. To tighten the belt, push down

6. To tighten the belt, push down on the child restraint, pull the shoulder portion of the belt to tighten the lap portion of the belt, and feed the shoulder belt back into the retractor. When installing a forward-facing child restraint, it may be helpful to use your knee to push down on the child restraint as you tighten the belt.

Try to pull the belt out of the retractor to make sure the retractor is locked. If the retractor is not locked, repeat Steps 5 and 6.

7. Before placing a child in the child restraint, make sure it is securely held in place. To check, grasp the child restraint at the seat belt path and attempt to move it side to side and back and forth. When the child restraint is properly installed, there should be no more than 2.5 cm (1 in) of movement.

If the airbags are off, the off indicator in the passenger airbag status indicator will come on and stay on when the vehicle is started.

If a child restraint has been installed and the on indicator is lit, see "If the On Indicator Is Lit for a Child Restraint" under Passenger Sensing System.

To remove the child restraint, unbuckle the vehicle seat belt and let it return to the stowed position.

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The vehicle has the following airbags: A frontal airbag for the driver A frontal airbag for the front outboard passenger A knee airbag for the driver A knee airbag for the front outboard passen ...

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